Louisa County Library

Louisa LibraryHours:
Monday - Tuesday: 11am - 7pm
Wednesday - Friday: 10am - 5pm
Saturday: 9am - 4pm
Sunday - Closed

Phone: 540.894.5853
Fax: 540.894.9810
Email Us

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Programs for Adults

CONNECTING @ YOUR LIBRARY

computer

 

One-on-one sessions offered to answer your computer use questions. Topics can include basic computer skills, MSOffice programs, online job applications, and learning. 30 minute sessions are scheduled by appointment.

TUESDAY EVENING BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP

Meets monthly (except for December) on the 4th Tuesday of each month from 7-8:30pm. The group will discuss a wide range of titles chosen by members and enjoy refreshments. Program listings are below.

Friday Family Movies

MovieZOOTOPIA (2016)

July 29, 2016
1:00 am

In a city of anthropomorphic animals, a rookie bunny cop and a cynical con artist fox must work together to uncover a conspiracy.
more info

Are You a DIY Person?

handcraftB.Y.O.C. - BRING YOUR OWN CRAFT

August 03, 2016
2:00 pm

Do you knit, bead, make rugs, hand stitch or do any kind of handcraft? Come to share ideas, show off your work and get another crafter's eye and perception. Chat and meet your neighbors while you work on your craft. Bring any project you're working on, or come just to be inspired. All ages and levels of experience welcome. Call or visit the library for details.
Meets every Wednesday

Quinn’s Auction Presents: What’s in Your Attic?

clutter

August 22, 2016
12:00 pm

June 27, July 25, August 22
Everyone has too much stuff and no one knows what to do with it. Your kids don't want it and Craigslist is too much work. Let the staff at Quinn's Auction Galleries offer tips and tricks to help you with the difficult process of downsizing. To keep or not to keep? To paint or to refinish? To sell or to donate? To buy or not to buy? Quinn's will help you answer these questions and more. Feel free to bring a treasured item that you would like to learn more about for the auction staff to review. What's in your attic?

Tuesday Evening Discussion Group

UNCOMMON READER by Alan Bennett

August 23, 2016
7:00 pm

Uncommon Reader is humorous fiction about Queen Elizabeth borrowing a library book. Check the Catalogbullet

Genealogy Room Exhibit

Arminius Mill

 

A handmade model of the Arminius Mill building, constructed by Michael Dunn, is on exhibit in the library's genealogy room. The original Mill housed steam powered machinery used to process pyrite ore. Pyrite contained the sulfur used to produce sulfuric acid, a component in many chemical processes. Mineral's rich mining history began in 1830 with gold mining and ended around 1921 with the closing of the pyrite mines.

Local Artists on Display

The Italo Scanga Foundation, a nonprofit trust that promotes the visual arts, has funded a permanent exhibit of original art by local artists. Paintings, sculpture, mosaics, quilts and photography are among the media to be displayed. Here is a sampling:
photo
Photographer: Richard Hinde
art
Artist: Janice Breeden

History of Louisa Library

A Branch in a Former Barber Shop

Original Louisa Library
Original Louisa Library

An early attempt to establish a library in Louisa County took place in 1953,when the Virginia State Library delivered books with a van. In 1971, 50 people turned out for a meeting with Raymond Williams, the Director of Jefferson-Madison Regional Library. From this event, a campaign was launched to create a branch in Louisa.

 

Within a year, the dream became reality. The Louisa County Branch Library opened on November 27, 1972, in a former barber shop on Main Street. This 440-square-foot space was rented by the county for $100 a month and was open 22 hours a week with two part-time staff. During the early years an occasional story hour was held in local churches. During the last year in the building, story hours and other children's programs were held in the branch, but due to severe space limitations the library was closed to the public. The library remained in those cramped quarters until October 1979.

More Room for Growth

Former Girl Scout house becomes Louisa Library
Former Girl Scout house becomes Louisa Library

In 1979, Louisa County purchased the charming Girl Scout house on West Street, a 2,252-square-foot building with a 305 square-foot meeting room. This location of the library, was open to the public 48 hours per week and had a staff that included a Branch Manager, 3 full-time and 2 part-time staff. The collection grew from 714 volumes to nearly 30,000 volumes with an annual circulation of over 116,000 items.

 

In 1987, the Louisa County Board of Supervisors created a Library Advisory Board with representatives from each voting district. In October 1988, this Board encouraged the County Supervisors to establish a Library Foundation for the purpose of acquiring a library site and constructing a larger, more modern library building.

A Wonderful New Home

New Louisa Library
New Louisa Library

More than ten years of working, planning and fund-raising resulted in a plan for construction of a new 15,000 square-foot library to be located adjacent to Louisa County Middle and High schools. Plans for the new branch included significantly larger collections, computers with Internet access, a historical and genealogical collection room, a large meeting room, space for tutoring and a law collection.

 

Ground was broken for the new Louisa Library in March 1999, and, on December 12, 1999, the branch was dedicated. Staff and community greeted the opening of the new building and with it, expanded services to the citizens of Louisa County.

 

The Library in the 21st Century

The library has many features of a modern 21st century library with public computers, printers, wireless internet, self checkout, and audiobooks and eBooks to download. The building survived the August 2011 earthquake with little damage, and the staff was able to provide assistance to the Louisa County Schools that sustained extreme damage. Today six school computers remain in the library to give students access to homework assignments.

 

As of 2013, the library houses 60,000 items that include books, books on CD, and DVDs for all ages. A staff of three full time and three part-time employees serve the community with internet tutorials, family film programs, adult and teen book discussion groups, and a wide range of programs for children.